Indian Journal of Community Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2015  |  Volume : 40  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 163--167

Serological, clinical, and epidemiological profile of human brucellosis in rural India


Smita S Mangalgi1, Annapurna G Sajjan1, Shivajirao T Mohite2, Satish V Kakade3 
1 Department of Microbiology, Bijapur Liberal Development Education University, Shri B. M. Patil Medical College, Bijapur, Karnataka, India
2 Professor of Microbiology, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, Karad, Maharashtra, India
3 Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, Karad, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Smita S Mangalgi
Department of Microbiology, Bijapur Liberal Development Education University, Shri B. M. Patil Medical College, Bijapur-586 103, Karnataka
India

Background: Brucellosis is an important but neglected zoonotic disease in India. Due to frequent animal contact, high prevalence of this disease, though expected in rural population, has not been much studied. Aim: The study was carried out to determine serological, clinical, and epidemiological profile including associated risk factors for human brucellosis in rural India. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, serum samples from 1,733 individuals residing in rural areas were screened for the presence of anti-brucellar antibodies by Rose Bengal Plate test (RBPT), Serum Agglutination test (SAT), and 2-Mercaptoethanol test (2-ME). Clinical symptoms, epidemiological data including risk factors and knowledge about brucellosis were evaluated by personal interview using a structured questionnaire. Results: Of the 1,733 individuals, 998 had direct contact with animals, whereas 735 had no direct contact. The overall positivity rates by RBPT, SAT, and 2-ME test were 10.50% (182), 7.32% (127), and 5.88% (102), respectively. Clinical symptoms resembling brucellosis were seen in 151 (8.71%) subjects. Animal contact especially during milking, parturition/abortion was the major risk factor, followed by raw milk ingestion. None of the participant knew about brucellosis. Conclusion: Regular surveillance of the disease with awareness programs emphasizing prevention and control are needed.


How to cite this article:
Mangalgi SS, Sajjan AG, Mohite ST, Kakade SV. Serological, clinical, and epidemiological profile of human brucellosis in rural India.Indian J Community Med 2015;40:163-167


How to cite this URL:
Mangalgi SS, Sajjan AG, Mohite ST, Kakade SV. Serological, clinical, and epidemiological profile of human brucellosis in rural India. Indian J Community Med [serial online] 2015 [cited 2022 Jun 29 ];40:163-167
Available from: https://www.ijcm.org.in/article.asp?issn=0970-0218;year=2015;volume=40;issue=3;spage=163;epage=167;aulast=Mangalgi;type=0